In Russia, the persecution of Jehovah’s Witnesses begins all over again


Anti-terror legislation is being used to target those whose faith is only ‘extreme’ in terms of its commitment to non-violence. It should be a warning to us all

 

 

A Jehovah’s Witness in London. ‘These were some of the most persecuted Christians of the 20th century.’ Photograph: Sean Smith for the Guardian

 

The small Siberian town of Birobidzhan is set in a mosquito-infested swampland on the far eastern end of the Trans-Siberian railway. It was to places such as this that the Soviets exiled various undesirables. In April 1951 more than 9,000 Jehovah’s Witnesses were rounded up and sent to Siberia on Stalin’s instruction. They were allowed to take 150kg of their possessions with them. Everything else was confiscated by the state.

You may walk past embarrassed as Jehovah’s Witnesses try and hand you cringeworthy religious literature on the high street. But these were some of the most persecuted Christians of the 20th century. And their persecution continues.

A couple of months ago, the Russian police raided the Birobidzhan branch of the Jehovah’s Witnesses and “discovered” extremist literature. The Jehovah’s Witnesses describe the incident thus: “Masked special police disrupted a religious meeting and planted literature under a chair in the presence of the attendees.” The police ordered the place to be permanently closed.

A few weeks later, the Russian ministry of justice demanded that the Jehovah’s Witnesses HQ hand over all information on their 2,277 Russian congregations. After a brief examination of what the police allegedly found, it concluded that the Jehovah’s Witnesses were showing signs of “extremist activity”. Congregations in Belgorod, Stary Oskol and Elista have all been shut down. Bibles have been impounded at customs, their literature banned. Many expect that the Russians are gearing up for an outright ban.

“Unfortunately, in today’s Russia, the will to confine Russians to restricted and state-determined religious beliefs has proved increasingly strong,” is how Andrew Wood, former British ambassador to Russia, described what has been going on. “Fabrication is always both repellent and a sign of desperation at the absence of credible proof of extremism.”

So what is it about Jehovah’s Witnesses that the Russians find so objectionable? This week, I decided not to avoid the eye of the couple who hand out literature at my tube station. So many times I’ve ignored them, and their Olympic smiling endurance, brushing past grumpily. Reading about their history, I now feel guilty about my lack of respect.

On open display was What Does the Bible Really Teach?, the book that the Russian authorities often plant in kingdom halls as an excuse to shut them down. I flicked through. It’s really not my thing. And the graphics are criminally cheesy. But it’s pretty bog-standard Christian fundamentalism, with an emphasis on the end of the world.

“What makes the Jehovah’s Witnesses different?” I asked the smiling man.

“We take the Bible literally,” he replied.

“But so do others. What makes you distinctive?”

“Take ‘thou shalt not kill,’” he replied. “We don’t participate in war.”

Jehovah’s Witnesses were taken to Nazi death camps for that very reason. They refused to swear loyalty to a worldly government and refused to serve in the military. They wouldn’t say Heil Hitler either. So within months of the Nazis coming to power, their meetings were ransacked and a Gestapo unit was set up to register all known Jehovah’s Witnesses. Their children were taken off them to receive a proper patriotic German education. And they were given their own purple triangle to wear as identification. In 1942, Wolfgang Kusserow was beheaded in Brandenburg prison by the Nazis for refusing to fight. “You must not kill,” he said at his trial. “Did our creator have all this written down for the trees?”

Jehovah’s Witnesses are right to fear what is happening to them again, right now, in Russia. They have seen it all before. It should be a warning to all of us that the idea under which they are now being persecuted is that of “extremism”. It’s a word that draws its persuasive force from those who would use their religion to plant bombs and sever heads. So anti-terror legislation is now also being used to target those whose faith is only “extreme” in terms of its commitment to non-violence. The Russians are using the fear of Islamism as an excuse to crack down on all religious activity that refuses to bow the knee to Mother Russia.

“My parents were exiled to Siberia,” said Yaroslav Sivulskiy, a spokesman for the Russian Jehovah’s Witnesses. “They worshipped even while they were in those camps. We will continue too.” Respect, I say.

 

source:  Giles Fraser  THE GUARDIAN

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  • SUSAN PEDIORD  On 28 mar 2017 at 17:57

    JOHN 15:17-27 17 “I am giving you these commands so that you may love each other. 18* If the world hates you, you know it has hated me before you. 19 If you belonged to the world, the world would love what was its own; but because you do not belong to the world but I picked you out of the world, for that reason the world hates you. 20 Remember the words that I said to you, ‘a servant is not greater than his master’: if they persecuted me, so they will you; if they kept my words, so they will yours. 21 But all this they will do to you on account of my name, because they do not know the one who sent me. 22 If I had not come and spoken to them they would not have any sin; but now they do not have any excuse for sin. 23 He who hates me is hating my Father too. 24 If I had not done among them the works that nobody else did, they would not have any sin; but now they have both seen and hated both me and my Father; 25 but it was so that the words written in their law should be fulfilled, ‘They hated me for nothing.’ 26 When the Spokesman comes whom I will send to you from the Father, the Spirit of Truth that goes out from the Father’s presence, he will testify about me; 27 and you too testify, because you have been with me from the first.

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